Airwar over Denmark

Airwar over Denmark

 By Søren C. Flensted

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FW 190A landed near Gislev 20/2 1944.


The aircraft belonged to 3./ JG 11 and was coded ?
T/o Oldebburg. Op: Attack on American bombers.


The FW 190 that was piloted by Oberfeldwebel Martin Heidenreich landed in a frozen ploughed field belonging to Farmer Eltzholtz of “Eriksminde” farm due to low fuel and was stopped next to the farmhouse.
 
The Eltzholtz family was having dinner when they heard the noise from the aircraft outside the house and all ran out to see what it was.
 
Heidenrich used the phone to inform Fluko about his whereabouts and was then invited to have dinner with the family. After a couple of hours a car arrived and took Heidenreich to Odense. A team of soldiers soon arrived to guard the aircraft.

The FW 190 seemed to be fairly undamaged apart from the drop tank that was holed from bullets. It was very cold in those days and one of the guards climbed up in the cockpit to get out of the wind. Apparently he pushed the wrong button or pulled the wrong handle as he ejected the canopy that was destroyed.

The FW 190 stayed for 14 days until it had been repaired. A Fiesler Storck arrived with a pilot to fly the FW 190 away. The aircraft was fuelled and towed over to a nearby grass field and after a couple of test runs down the field it took off.

Having invited Heidenreich to dinner created a problem for Farmer Eltzholtz in May 1945 when Denmark was liberated.

A not very friendly neighbour reported Eltzholtz to the resistance for having been too friendly to the Germans. Eltzholtz was arrested and taken to the former German headquarter in Ollerup where he was kept for a couple of days until the matter had been sorted out. He was then released without any charges being pressed against him.



Sources: LBUK, JG 1/11.
 

 

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